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Fetal Echo Reveals the Structure, Function of Baby’s Heart

Fetal echocardiography uses an ultrasound probe to generate sound-based images of a baby’s heart, allowing doctors to better view its structure and function before birth. The majority of Congenital Heart Defects (CHD) can be diagnosed with fetal echo, with some exceptions. Some problems, such as very small holes in the heart, are difficult to detect even with advanced equipment. The most common reason a pregnant woman visits Sibley Heart Center Cardiology for a fetal echo is upon referral from her obstetrician or perinatologist. They may detect something unusual on a routine ultrasound and suspect a problem with the heart,” said Erik Michelfelder, MD, Director of Fetal Cardiology at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta Heart Center. “They will then send the mom to us to confirm their findings and make a detailed diagnosis.” Other maternal indications that can prompt a referral for a fetal echo include a family history of heart disease, especially if either mother, father or a prior child has a diagnosis of CHD. If the mother is on medication that has the potential to cause birth defects, or if she has certain autoimmune diseases or diabetes, a fetal echo may be performed. Sibley cardiologists are also asked to evaluate…

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Former Patient Returns to Sibley to Launch Career

At 16, Chelsea Parsons experienced an episode at a cross country meet in which her heart rate climbed to an alarming 200 beats per minute. Paramedics were able to bring it down, but she was referred to Sibley Heart Center Cardiology in Alpharetta for further cardiac evaluation. She was diagnosed with atrioventricular nodal reentry tachycardia (AVNRT), the most common type of supraventricular tachycardia. AVNRT tends to occur more often in young women, and episodes often start and end suddenly. It occurs because of a reentrant electrical circuit located in or near the AV node that causes the heart to beat prematurely. The AV node is important in regulating the passage of electrical impulses from the upper (atria) to the lower (ventricles) chambers of the heart. “We spent a couple of months of trying to work out how aggressive it was, if it was common and whether I could take medication for it or just deal with it,” Chelsea said. “After having a few more episodes, we decided for ablation.” While she was nervous about going under anesthesia for the first time, Chelsea said the team at Sibley made her and her parents feel comfortable, and the ablation was a total…

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Kids at Heart Connects Families with Others Who “Get It”

In the mid-1990s, a small group of "heart parents" seeking community with one another started a potluck dinner in the Egleston Hospital conference room. What began as a simple desire to get to know other families walking the same congenital heart disease (CHD) path has grown into a program called Kids at Heart, which now serves about 2,000 families. The program is run by two staff coordinators, Kati Keyes and Alison Mueller. As a parent, I enjoyed seeing SO many other heart families and feeling like we were where we belonged. That there were people who KNEW what we were going through.”     Kids at Heart, which is 100 percent donor funded, administers an active Facebook group of 1,000 parents and hosts many events throughout the year designed to connect young heart patients and their families to each other. Every event is free to CHD families, who are often facing heavy financial burdens associated with their child’s care. “Everybody has so much that they juggle. Our families tell us that they might never be able to spend a day as a family doing the some of the activities we plan for them and how much they value these moments of normalcy,”…

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Never Count Them Out: Heart Warrior Kid Shows Her Strength

Although Brandy Spradlin’s pregnancy was high risk and she had nearly 30 sonograms during the course of it, she and her husband had no idea that anything would be out of the ordinary when their daughter was born. The Sibley doctor who saw Charli Jane within hours of Brandy’s birth said five different things were going on with her heart, and she had a 99.9 percent chance of having the chromosomal abnormality, 22q Deletion Syndrome. She was life flighted to Egleston from Piedmont Fayette Hospital. “My youngest was 12 at the time,” Brandy said. “Our other three kids had never even been sick, beyond the occasional strep throat. We were taken by complete surprise.” Charli had her first heart surgery at just five days old and another at 7 months to treat her multiple diagnoses of Interrupted Aortic Arch + VSD, Subvalvular Aortic Stenosis, and Branch Pulmonary Artery Stenosis . Now 9, she will likely need more surgeries as she grows, but doctors say her current heart repairs may last until middle school. Brandy says that Charli’s pediatric cardiologist, Heather Phelps, MD, goes above and beyond for her family. Charli is comfortable at her cardiology appointments with Dr. Phelps, asking…

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Feed the Heart Allows Families to Focus on Caring for Their Children Instead of ‘What’s for Dinner?”

In 2015, Vicki Haug was a nurse at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta. One of her cardiac patients belonged to a family of seven, who was traveling back and forth to Egleston from Augusta as their young daughter waited for a heart transplant in the hospital. Weeks had turned into months, and one evening, the family confided to her that they didn’t have anything for their dad to eat. Vicki’s sister was in treatment for cancer, and she knew well how expensive it was to eat at the hospital for days and weeks on end. Her heart went out to them. Vicki wrote a proposal for the Cardiac Family Advisory Council requesting that the group provide a snack cart once a day and dinner once a month for cardiac patient families. The Director of Cardiac Services encouraged her to “give it a shot,” and her supervisor, Becky Johnson, helped Vicki acquire a cart and find space at Egleston. With a generous initial donation from a Sibley cardiologist and the enthusiastic participation of cardiac families who were eager to help each other, Feed the Heart was born. “It costs about $20 a day for one parent to eat here,” Vicki said. “They…

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Understanding the Heart-Brain Connection Leads to Better Patient Care

While the heart-brain connection is not completely understood in medical circles, doctors do know that the connection exists. They develop at the same time in utero, and the heart provides critical blood flow to the brain. When the heart is compromised, it may be unable to adequately meet the blood flow demands of the brain, putting a child at risk for motor and language delays, learning difficulties, attention problems and social challenges. “Babies can be born with smaller brains or a neurological injury like stroke or cardiac arrest or any temporary stop blood flow to brain can cause developmental delays and challenges later in life,” said Nneka Morris Alexander, PhD, pediatric psychologist for cardiac services, Department of Neuropsychology. “In addition, kids who have surgery within their first few months of life may be at higher risk of having developmental delays.” Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta’s Cardiac Neurodevelopmental Program provides critical mental health support to cardiac patients and families, as these patients are typically hospitalized for long periods of time. Dr. Alexander oversees inpatient screening and treatment of medically related trauma and stress in patients and families. She also conducts outpatient screenings of developmental skills for infants and toddlers with congenital heart…

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Preventing Sudden Cardiac Death Requires a Two-Pronged Approach

In a nutshell, Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) means a person ceases to have an effective heartbeat. While a heart attack is a “plumbing” problem more common to adults, an SCA in pediatric or young adult patients is more likely to be “electrical.” Most people don’t think of kids as having heart problems at all, but there is a long list of pediatric cardiac disorders that could lead to SCA. Most are very rare, and some are inherited. Once diagnosed, any of these cardiac conditions should be closely monitored to prevent SCA. "When a child has SCA, it’s common that people will describe the child as having been perfectly healthy,” said Robert Campbell, MD, pediatric cardiologist at Sibley Heat Center Cardiology. “However, they were not perfectly healthy, just undiagnosed.” Real life examples of this would be Ella, who had SCA during a basketball game, and Claire, who experienced cardiac arrest during a volleyball game. You can watch Claire's story here. Dr. Campbell said the incidence of pediatric/young adult sudden cardiac death is not known but is estimated to be about 1-4,000 per year in the U.S. Not all cases of SCA result in death because people are resuscitated or the SCA…

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Hypertension in Kids Often Treated by Lifestyle Changes

The Children’s Preventive Cardiology Program provides services for kids with conditions that put them at risk for early heart attack and stroke. When risk factors such as obesity, high cholesterol, diabetes and hypertension are properly treated, often with just a healthy diet and exercise, early cardiovascular disease may be prevented. One of the risk factors of early cardiovascular disease is hypertension or elevated blood pressure. Hypertension describes the force of the blood pushing against the artery walls. What is considered elevated blood pressure in children varies based on age and height. When a child reaches age 13, adult data is used, and blood pressures of 120/80 are considered elevated. “Hypertension in kids older than three frequently displays no signs or symptoms,” said Michelle Wallace, MD, pediatric cardiologist at Sibley Heart Center Cardiology. “Sometimes they can have frequent headaches or bloody noses. Some kids have white coat syndrome, where their blood pressure is only elevated in the doctor’s office.” While hypertension can be connected to conditions like obesity, kidney disease, an endocrine or heart problem, such as narrowing of the aorta, in most cases doctors don’t have a good cause for hypertension in children. Hypertension can cause increased thickness of the…

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